Barry Flanary, Ph.D.

chair, assistant professor, The John Merck Division of Science and Technology

Everett Mansion, Room 310
bflanary@svc.edu
802-447-4312

Barry Flanary, Assistant Professor of medical microbiology and human biology at SVC, is fascinated with the aging process and the effect it has on the human brain.

“A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of brain aging provides an innovative perspective on the normal aging process as well as the origins of Alzheimer's diseases pathogenesis. Strategies designed to prevent/slow cellular aging may provide a novel approach toward Alzheimer's prevention/treatment,” says Flanary.

His research on telomeres – which protect chromosome ends from deterioration – has earned him a great deal of recognition, including an invitation to contribute a chapter in the recently-published book: “Telomeres: Function, Shortening, and Lengthening” by Nova Science Publishers. Professor Flanary’s chapter is entitled Expert Commentary: “The Role of Microglial Cellular Senescence in the Aging and Alzheimer Diseased Brain.”

While working toward his Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Flanary presented his research at many scientific conferences and received several grants and fellowships focusing on aging research. He earned his Ph.D. in February 2005. He earned his M.S. in 2001 and his B.S. in 1999 from Illinois State University.

Flanary joined SVC in 2009. In addition to being an Assistant Professor, he also serves as Director of the Healthcare Management and Advocacy (HMA) program, SVC's newest major. This past summer he directed SVC's first annual HMA certification program, which provided an overview of the U.S. healthcare system, and he implemented technological innovations into the fall HMA classrooms.

Flanary says he loves teaching at SVC, interacting with students, and showing them how fun biology is. “Students are the future of science and society,” he says. “It is a privilege to help them understand the importance and relevance of biology to their everyday lives and other academic disciplines.”

Education

  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, February 2005.
  • M.S., Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois, July 2001.
  • B.S., Biological Sciences, Chemistry minor, Illinois State University, Normal Illinois, May 1999.
  • A.S., Illinois Valley Community College, Oglesby, Illinois, May 1996.

Teaching Experience

Courses

  • Medical Microbiology 
  • Human Biology

academic Research/interests

    Cellular and organismal aging, telomeres, telomerase, Alzheimer's disease, and age-related diseases.

    Why I teach

      Students are the future of science and society. It is a privilege to help them understand the importance and relevance of biology to their everyday lives and other academic disciplines. I love teaching, interacting with students, and showing them how fun Biology is.

      research presentations

      • September 7-11, 2005: "Analysis of telomere length and telomerase activity in tree species of various life-spans, and with age in the Bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva." Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS) second conference, Queen's College, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
      • February 25, 2005: "Analysis of rat microglial cellular senescence as determined by measurements of telomere length and telomerase activity." Ph.D. dissertation defense, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL.
      • June 10, 2004: "The role of microglial senescence in the aging and Alzheimer diseased brain." Bryan W. Robinson Memorial Endowment for the Neurosciences of the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Foundation, Inc., at Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.
      • March 5, 2004: "The role of microglial senescence in the aging and Alzheimer diseased brain." The Inaugural International Conference on Longevity, plenary panel member on cellular aging and clinical interventions, Sydney Australia.
      • November 20, 2002: Analysis of telomere length and telomerase activity in microglia. National Institute on Aging technical assistance workshop for emerging Scientists and students seeking careers in aging research, Boston, MA.
      • October 31, 2002: Analysis of telomere length in astrocytes and microglia. The third annual Neurobiology of Aging conference: Molecular and cellular basis of synaptic loss and dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, Orlando, FL.
      • July 23, 2001: Molecular cloning, characterization, and mutagenesis of the msbB gene, a secondary lipid A acyltransferase, in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Master's thesis defense, Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL. 

      endowments

      • June 2002 to May 2005: Bryan W. Robinson Memorial Endowment for the Neurosciences of the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Foundation, Inc. at Florida State University, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida. "The role of microglial senescence in the aging and Alzheimer diseased brain."

      fellowships:

      • March 2005 to February 2006: Post-doctoral research Fellowship, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida.
      • August 2004 to July 2006: Graduate Fellowship for Outstanding Research Award, Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences, University of Florida.
      • July 2003 to June 2004: University of Florida Neurobiology of Aging Fellowship, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida.
      • May 2002 to December 2004: American Foundation for Aging Research Fellowship at North Carolina State University, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida.
      • Additional Fellowships in Interdiscplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences, Graduate teaching and research Fellowships, and Undergraduate Research Fellow (National Science Foundation Collaborative Research at Undergraduate Institutions Research Training Program Grant).

      grants

      • February 2005 to January 2010: National Institute on Aging R01 (AG023665-01). Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida. Microglial dysfunction in the aged and Alzheimer's brain.
      • December 2002 to November 2005: The Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Research Foundation investigator-initiated grant program of the McKnight Brain Institute, Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida. Analysis of telomere length and telomerase activity in microglia.
      • December 2000 to December 2001: Graduate student association research grant, Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University. Characterization of a lipid A acyltransferase in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. 

      honors/extracurricular activities

      • 2008: Scientific reviewer of textbook "The Living World" (6th edition, McGraw-Hill publishers): Chapter 14 (Gene Technology) and Chapter 16 (The Revolution in Cell Technology).
      • 2008 to present: Reviewer for the scientific journal "Plant Cell Reports," "Archives of Medical Research," and "Tree Genetics and Genomes."
      • 2008: Scientific reviewer for the academic textbook "Brooks Medical Microbiology," 24th edition.
      • 2007 to present: Editorial Board member for the scientific journal Geriatric Medicine.
      • 2006 to present: Reviewer for the "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease."
      • 2005 to present: Scientific Advisory Board member for the Supercentenarian Research Foundation. Foundation goals: Promote and fund scientific research in the causes of aging.
      • 2001 to 2003: Scientific reviewer of book Cells, Aging, and Human Disease by Michael Fossel, M.D., Ph.D., Oxford University Press (copyright 2004).
      • 2000 to present: Editorial Board member for the Journal of Anti-Aging Medicine (renamed in 2004 to Rejuvenation Research).

      publications (Original research articles)

      • Flanary BE, Sammons NW, Nguyen C, Walker D, Streit WJ. 2007. "Evidence that aging and amyloid promote microglial cell senescence." Rejuvenation Res. 10(1), 61-74.
      • Flanary BE, Streit WJ. 2006. "Alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) induces rapid, nonsustained, proliferation in cultured rat microglia." Glia. 53(6), 669-674.
      • Flanary BE, Streit WJ. 2005. "Effects of axotomy on telomere length, telomerase activity, and protein in activated microglia." J. Neurosci. Res. 82(2), 160-171.
      • Flanary BE, Kletetschka G. 2005. Analysis of telomere length and telomerase activity in tree species of various life-spans, and with age in the bristlecone pine Pinus longaeva. Biogerontol. 6(s), 101-111.
      • Flanary BE, Streit WJ. 2004. Progressive telomere shortening occurs in cultured rat microglia, but not astrocytes. Glia. 45(1), 75-88.
      • Flanary BE, Streit WJ. 2003. Telomeres shorten with age in rat cerebellum and cortex in vivo. J. Anti-Aging Med. 6(4), 299-308.
      • Van Rhein SL, Flanary BE, Juliano SA. 2000. Effects of habitat type and drying on Ascogregarina barretti (Eugregarinida: Lecudinidae) infection in Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culcidae). J. Med. Entomol. 37(6), 950-956. 

      publications (book chapters)

      • Flanary. BE. 2009. The role of microglial cellular senescence in the aging and Alzheimer diseased brain in the book Telomeres: Function, shortening, and lengthening. Nova Science Publishers. In press. 

      publications (reviews)

      • Fossel, M. Flanary, B. 2009. Telomerase and human disease: The beginnings of the ends? Rejuvenation Research. In press.
      • Flanary, BE. 2007. Journal article review. The Scientist. January 2007.
      • Barry Flanary. Literature Reviews: Reviews of the Gerontology Literature and Book Review. Rejuvenation Res. Spring 2004 to Summer 2005. 5 total reviews.
      • Barry Flanary. Literature Reviews: Reviews of the Gerontology Literature and Book Review. J. Anti-Aging Med. Fall 2000 to Winter 2003. 17 total reviews.  

      Favorite Book

      • In the past I have read mostly scientific textbooks (for coursework requirements) and currently read books on science and personal finance. One of my favorite books is Jurassic Park, and the last book I've read is Curious George Makes Pancakes.

      Favorite film

      • There are several favorites such as: The Terminator, Aliens, Titanic, MacGyver, Good Will Hunting, The Shawshank Redemption, Indiana Jones, The Departed, Heat, October Sky, and WALL-E.

      Best part of being at SVC

      • The students, the academic community, and the scenic mountain views.

      HIGHLIGHTS

      • August 2010 - Implemented technological innovations into the fall Healthcare Management and Advocacy classrooms in order to enhance the learning environment. These innovations include utilizing enhanced high-definition audio/video technology to permit real-time distance learning within the classroom.
      • July 2010 - Completed the first annual summer research training course on aging and Alzheimer's disease. This course focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Students participated directly in the research, from experimental design to data analysis and presentation.
      • July 2010 - Directed SVC's first annual summer Healthcare Management and Advocacy (HMA) certificate program. This course provided an overview of the U.S. healthcare system, including healthcare financing, diversity and cultural competency in healthcare, basic issues of aging, healthcare planning and law, assessment, inteviewing and communications skills, as well as a hands-on tour of the new SVC simulation lab.
      • October 2009 - Professor Barry Flanary’s research on telomeres earned him recognition and requests for writing opportunities, including the invitation to contribute a chapter to the just published book, “Telomeres: Function, Shortening, and Lengthening” by Nova Science Publishers. Professor Flanary’s chapter is entitled Expert Commentary: “The Role of Microglial Cellular Senescence in the Aging and Alzheimer Diseased Brain.”
      • August 2009 - Co-authored a scientific review manuscript just accepted by the highly regarded science journal Rejuvenation Research. The paper entitled "Telomerase and Human Disease: The Beginnings of the Ends?" was co-authored with Michael Fossel, M.D., Ph.D.